Monday, 25 April 2016

Xamarin Evolve 5k

Update: thanks everyone who ran!

There's been a tradition for the more energetic attendees to do a morning 5k run during Xamarin Evolve - and 2016 will be no different! Xamarins have been out training most mornings, and we look forward to meeting and running with our customers. It's a FUN run, not a race - if you've got your gear and can complete the distance, please join us! Follow @conceptdev for twitter updates.

Date: Wednesday 27th (first day of conference, before the keynote)
Time: 6:15am
Place: outside Hyatt reception (near the flagpoles)

The Course

We'll run a flat 5km (3.2 mile) loop anti-clockwise around the conference center and surrounds:

It'll be early morning so traffic should be light (based on the past few days), however there are a couple of road crossings and safety will be the priority over speed. This is what the meeting place looks like at 6:15am:

For the speedsters, hang around at the end if possible to celebrate with everyone, get a group photo, and ensure you get mini-hack credit for completing the run!

Monday, 4 April 2016

Introducing Xamarin Workbooks

The first public demonstration of Xamarin's new Workbooks idea was Miguel de Icaza's //build 2016 talk "Mobile First" (although he first wrote about it back in February). In his talk, Miguel demonstrates a new take on interactive documentation in which a Markdown-formatted file can live-execute C# code-fenced blocks; not just in-line but also in an iOS or Android simulator.

This opens up a great opportunity to write and share interactive documentation that not only describes an API or feature, but shows it in action. Further, it's easy to write, being based on the well-known Markdown format.

Give it a try!

You can now try Workbooks for yourself! The editor can be downloaded here, and there is some Workbook documentation on the Xamarin developer portal.

I've thrown together a few very simple ideas on github:

See Miguel's talk (if you didn't already) for a really cool demo.

Some Notes

  1. They're written in Markdown, but with a .workbook file extension.
  2. Each file begins with a small JSON-formatted metadata section. The editor will add this for you.
  3. C# code inside triple-backtick code fences will be executed when the file is viewed in the Workbooks editor. 
There's sure to be other resources popping up now that the project preview is publicly available -- Ben Bishop's video is the first community resource I've seen. Can't wait to see what everyone creates with it!